Carteret Community College Title III Grant

March 3, 2007

Institutional Learning Outcomes

We’ve spent the last two weeks focusing on Institutional Learning Outcomes, and I’m extremely proud to report that college-wide participation has been fantastic. We started by holding three “forums” to discuss the importance of ILOs, outline the process of choosing ILOs for CCC, and then explore examples of ILOs that other schools had implemented. All three forums were standing room only!

We then emailed out a list of 16 potential ILOs for CCC, and asked everyone to pick their top five. We had a tremendous response rate…over 80(!!) faculty and staff responded to our call to action by 5pm Friday. Click here for a complete list of potential ILOs, along with brief descriptors of each.

Here are the final numbers (with no hanging chads):

The Top-Five ILOs for CCC:
3. Communication (76) (many thought that #16-Writing should be included in this category)
4. Critical Thinking (70)
5. Computer Literacy (59)
11. Personal Growth & Responsibility (50)
10. Information Literacy (38)

The full run down:
1. Act (17) (one respondent wanted this to include “ethically”)
2. Apply (11)
3. Communication (76)
4. Critical Thinking (70)
5. Computer Literacy (59)
6. Cultural & Social Understanding (17)
7. Environmental Stewardship (17)
8. Explore the Fine Arts & Humanities (6)
9. Globalization (7)
10. Information Literacy (38)
11. Personal Growth & Responsibility (50)
12. Quantitative Reasoning (16)
13. Research (9)
14. Scientific Reasoning (5)
15. Value (27)
16. Writing (28)
17. Write- ins (2)
* CCC graduates will have basic 21st Century job skills including adaptability, flexibility, resiliency, and the ability to accept ambiguity;
* Compassion: students will leave this institution with compassion for their fellow man, which will motivate them to think of the needs of many; before and as often as they think of their needs.

Next up? We will identify a committee that will work on defining and refining the top-five ILOs. From these definitions, rubrics and assessment plans will be developed to take this process to the next level. Stay tuned!

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12 Comments »

  1. Great process and participation. I am a bit concerned that none of the ILO’s address social or cultural literacies or competencies. This to me would be worth considering especially when diversity and globalization are such critical 21st century and workforce preparedness skills. Just a thought.

    Comment by Johnny Undewood — March 4, 2007 @ 9:39 am | Reply

  2. I agree with the concern about social/cultural literacy. Additionally, it seems important for our students to have computational skills. We may be able to address some of these as we refine the statements. This list doesn’t mean that we will not pay attention to other outcomes, we are just report on these. Also, this is just the first round–after we’ve assessed these outcomes for a couple of cycles, we may add, subtract, or modify the outcomes that we report. Hope that makes sense. Fran

    Comment by Fran Emory — March 4, 2007 @ 8:04 pm | Reply

  3. Johnny,
    If you read the description under Personal Growth and Responsibility, it uses terms like “social environment” and “understanding of the diversity of the world community.” So I do think that your concerns are covered under one of the selected ILOs. I share Fran’s concern about math not being included. I would hazard a guess that the way “Quantitative Reasoning” was worded, people didn’t interpret it as meaning to be successful with math. I think, worded differently, it would have gotten a lot more votes. I also feel that “Writing” is important, but agree with whoever said that it should be, and is, included under “Communication.” I was (big surprise…) thrilled to see that Information Literacy made the list! Jean

    Comment by Jean Baardsen — March 5, 2007 @ 9:18 am | Reply

  4. As for process, it was helpful to be able to write in a suggested ILO, but I am not sure how a write-in fits into the process since the write-ins did not receive votes from anyone else. While using ILO’s from other institutions or systems helped stream-line the process, my reaction to some of the suggested ILO’s was “way too verbose!” I also felt some concern that our potential ILOs were not specific to preparation for jobs and careers. I believe it would be helpful to incorporate some dicsussion of 21st-Century Basic Job Skills (p. 22, McCabe, R. (2000). No one to waste: A report to public decision makers and comunity college leaders. Wasington,DC: American Association of Community Colleges).
    Perhaps I quibble. On the whole, I found the process to be very good.

    Comment by Louise Mathews — March 5, 2007 @ 10:32 am | Reply

  5. […] data in a few, select courses to a broader, program-level approach.  In the past,  Gen Ed (a.k.a. ILLO – institutional level learning outcomes) data had been gathered via relevant courses that had the greatest number of students passing […]

    Pingback by The Common Rubric (for Gen Ed assessments) « Carteret Community College Title III Grant — June 27, 2011 @ 7:55 am | Reply

  6. […] data in a few, select courses to a broader, program-level approach.  In the past,  Gen Ed (a.k.a. ILLO – institutional level learning outcomes) data had been gathered via relevant courses that had the greatest number of students passing […]

    Pingback by The Common Rubric « Carteret Community College Title III Grant — June 27, 2011 @ 8:41 am | Reply

  7. […] to assessing General Education Outcomes (Institutional Level Learning Outcomes – ILLOs).  Prior to that point, the seven ILLOs had been assessed in specific, relevant courses (e.g. Written C….  The revised process would assess ILLOs at the program level.  That is, each program would be […]

    Pingback by General Education Assessment – 2011 « Carteret Community College Title III Grant — June 27, 2011 @ 8:48 am | Reply

  8. […] to assessing General Education Outcomes (Institutional Level Learning Outcomes – ILLOs).  Prior to that point, the seven ILLOs had been assessed in specific, relevant courses (e.g. Written C….  The revised process would assess ILLOs at the program level.  That is, each program would be […]

    Pingback by Gen Ed Outcomes Assessment (at CCC) | North Carolina Community College Learning Outcomes Assessment Group — June 27, 2011 @ 8:54 am | Reply

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