Carteret Community College Title III Grant

June 7, 2011

T3 Final Months…

We are entering the final months of receiving our Title III grant. Looking back over the past 5 years I feel very good about what we as a college have accomplished in Distance Learning with the various instructional initiatives Title III enabled us to pursue. All in all I believe T3 has benefited the college and all our distance learning endeavors. Looking back I would have to say that pre-planning and fluid “open / transparent” communication between the T3 Project Director and myself the Director of Distance Learning was one of key’s to the success of our campus wide distance learning professional development initiatives. There is no doubt in my mind that the faculty and staff at Carteret Community College are more proficient both technically and in their online teaching methodology because of the funding and support that came from Title III.

Once CCC received the grant the first thing our T3 Project Director Don Staub did was have me create a T3 Blog to post anything and everything that related to Title III at our college. This was an effort to make the entire process transparent. Anyone can go to the T3 Blog and our CCC Distance Learning Blog and learn about all the professional development and college enhancement activities Title III supported through grants and the purchase of instructional and distance learning technologies.


The following are some of the primary distance learning highlights “successes” supported by Title III.

Distance Learning Pioneer Program
Online Tutoring Service Pilot Program
Blackboard Boot Camp

NC3ADL Regional and State Wide Conferences
Online Retention
• Peer Review “QAP” Online Course Evaluation Project

Distance Learning Campus Wide Forum

Assessing Distance Learning
• Moodle “Train the Trainer” Project
Moodle Migration Initiative

As of now over 50 staff and faculty have participated in the DL Pioneer Program which has positively impacted the online courses we offer here at CCC. Faculty have more tools and technology for doing an effective (and innovative) job teaching their courses in the online environment and have been given training both on campus and off in a variety of e-learning and instructional design “best practices”.

As we head into the final months of the grant it is imperative that we expand on the strong foundation Title III has helped us build here at Carteret Community College. There’s no doubt that the culture here at CCC has changed for the better as far as embracing technology and the latest instruction design best practices for e-learning. Our online courses incorporate a variety of “rich media” in order to address the different learning styles of our students. This would not have happened so extensively across campus if it wasn’t for the aggressive and ongoing training provided through T3 funding and support.

Our challenge is to put procedures in place so we can continue expanding upon the many successes T3 has helped us attain in Distance Learning over the past 5 years. The Distance Learning Advisory committee is in the process of developing a policy and procedure manual for distance learning. Many of these policies and procedures have been inspired by what we learned through all our T3 sponsored projects and initiatives.

Our goal is to continue to build on the momentum we’ve gained over the past 5 years thanks to the Title III grant. We have seen the culture at CCC change (evolve) over the past 5 yeare to embrace technology and online tools and applications in order to be on the “cutting edge” of online education – Title III has been a catalyst for this change in attitude and has added to the confidence of our staff and faculty to make the seamless transition from the traditional classroom environment to online instruction.

Video and Written Testimonials by Staff and Faculty.

Joseph Croom from CCC Student Services commented about a Title III sponsored conference, “This was an amazing conference, it was my first NC3ADL conference…something that made me really open my eyes. I learned so much about student services, and how to make sure that they are accessible by all. I was able to meet so many different people, from different jobs, at different colleges that brought a variety of perspectives on DL, and its place in the world today. I was able to get many new ideas that I plan to work with my department Student Services and the college overall to make Carteret Community College a great place to work, teach, serve and learn.

I thoroughly enjoyed going to the sessions on the NCCCS Help Desk, the Online Student Services, Google Apps for Education, and the great Skype presentation on Moodle.

Though it scares me, it excites me…stepping out on the ledge…driving the engine of Student Services, getting them up the hill and down the other side. I came back with great suggestions, so much energy, and great comments…the Registrar’s Office decided today to add live chat to their website.

I am so excited about the ideas swirling in my mind…causing waves of DL energy!! I hope that I will be able to go next year and the regional meeting in March….!!!!

CCC Anatomy and Physiology Instructor Phillip Morris stated, I was greatly impressed with the NC3DLA conference. From the level of organization to just how incredibly informative the conference was. Kudos to those involved in putting the whole thing together. I came away with knowledge and ideas that I hadn’t even imagined. The first thing I took with me is how many improvements I can make to my online courses. It doesn’t matter how good you think they already are there is always room for improvement. I personally am now aware at how deficient my courses are in the area of accessibility for special needs students. I will certainly work to correct that. Also, seeing what is now out there in the area of online science labs impressed me. From the late-night-lab presentation and demonstrations to the virtual microscope software available, all I kept saying was “wow”. Always something new, always changing. As a new faculty member, it also gave me a chance to really get to know some of my colleagues here at CCC. It was a group of great people and great educators. People who love what they do. It was a great experience.

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October 12, 2010

Assessing DL: Are they learning what we’re teaching

Filed under: Conferences,Presentations,T3 Presentations — Donald Staub @ 1:04 am

 

click on image to download ppt

 

This was a presentation made at the 2010 conference of the North Carolina Association of Community College Instructional Administrators (NCACCIA) in Asheville.  Comments and feedback on this presentation are greatly appreciated!

Relevant documents referred to in this presentation:

  • The Quality Assessment Plan (QAP) for evaluating and certifying distance learning courses before they go “live”
  • SACS Policy on Distance Learning:

  • Distance Learning Program Evaluations:

April 11, 2010

Exploring the Assessment of Distance Learning – April 11, 2010

Click on image to download ppt

On April 11th, I made a presentation on assessing Distance Learning at Carteret CC. The framework for the presentation is the new set of guidelines that SACS has on their website for assessing DL.

Artifacts mentioned in the presentation:

In my presentation, I referred to a number of artifacts – but I only showed snapshots of them. Here are some of them, more easily accessed:

  • SACS-COC document: Distance Education and the Principles of Accreditation

  • CCC-Distance Learning blog – which includes information on all of the bootcamps for training faculty.
  • The Quality Assessment Plan (QAP) for evaluating and certifying distance learning courses before they go “live”
  • A similar instrument – for assessing online courses – developed at Cal State Chico.

  • Rubrics used for discussion boards in DL courses. Here are two examples: RCP 114 (Respiratory Therapy) and ART 111.

March 15, 2010

NC3ADL Presentation – Assessing Distance Learning

click on the image to download the PPT

On March 15th, I made a presentation on assessing Distance Learning at Carteret CC.  The framework for the presentation is the new set of guidelines that SACS has on their website for assessing DL.

Artifacts mentioned in the presentation:

In my presentation, I referred to a number of artifacts – but I only showed snapshots of them.  Here are some of them, more easily accessed:

  • SACS-COC document: Distance Education and the Principles of Accreditation

  • CCC-Distance Learning blog – which includes information on all of the bootcamps for training faculty.
  • The Quality Assessment Plan (QAP) for evaluating and certifying distance learning courses before they go “live”
  • A similar instrument – for assessing online courses – developed at Cal State Chico.

  • Rubrics used for discussion boards in DL courses.  Here are two examples: RCP 114 (Respiratory Therapy) and ART 111.

March 13, 2010

5th Annual NC3ADL Conference – March 14-16

Filed under: Conferences,Presentations,T3 Presentations — Donald Staub @ 10:57 pm

click on image to go to conference site

Myself and a group of colleagues from CCC will be establishing a formidable presence at this year’s NC3ADL Annual Conference.  Not only will we be attending, but we’ll be presenting like crazy, too.  Patrick Keough is all over the agenda, including a workshop on Sunday and a panel discussion on Tuesday.  Laurie Freshwater will be taking the stage on Monday and Tuesday, as will I (Don Staub).  I will be presenting on effectively assessing distance learning – at the institutional and course level.  The full agenda can be found here. And, of course, we’ll be blogging from the conference as we report back on what we see as the state-of-the-art in DL across North Carolina.  Follow us here as we fill up this space with thoughts, comments, questions, and photos.

Sunday March 14 – Workshops

Kelly Kirk – The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Points and comments provided by Cathy Crowell and Lela McClanahan

  • Students being totally lost as far as where to go… and what to do… even how to log on properly.
  • Instructors do not log in/pay attention the Discussion Board often enough
  • Poor use of chat rooms
  • Forcing a traditional instructor into an online situation without proper training
  • Waiting until the END of the semester to give feedback/communication/grades
  • Good rubric to use for online classes: “Seven Principles…”
  • We’ll soon have a link here to his PPT

Monday March 15 – breakout sessions

First thing this morning Don attended a session on Campus Cruiser – the single sign-on portal for all communications.  I’m familiar with portals because of the last institution I worked at.  I thought their portal was useful and attractive.  I can’t say that I was as impressed with Campus Cruiser.  Folks from Wayne CC collaborated on the presentation, and they showed their portal as an example.  Although it has practicality (getting messages out to students and employees), and again, the one-stop-shop aspect, but I really felt that it lacked the design that made it an attractive place to land – it had the look of something that was a have-to go to, as opposed to a want-to go to.

Bringing Your Student Services Online

Dr. Candace Holder, NCCCS Quality and Assessment Center Surry Community College

Dr. Linda Nelms, Vice President Student Services Wayne Community College

The NCCCS Quality and Assessment Center has been working on a two year project to identify requirements for local colleges student services being offered to online students. This presentation will present findings and provide recommendations on how your college can meet SACs requirements for this area.

Materials presented are specific to NC community colleges and the SACs requirements related to offering student services for online students.

  • Gathering data on online services currently available
  • Depth & breadth
  • Challenges
  • Recommendations for resources

Provide a guide for best practices (based on SACS)

Stages

  1. Web: services are static web pages
  2. Interactive forms
  3. Incorporates personalized service
  4. Web portals
  5. Artificial Intelligence Functionality

Key points of review of services (see handout)

Accurate & timely information

    • Pre registration
    • Application
    • Placement testing
    • Enrollment
    • FA
    • Secure payment options
    • Advising
    • Timely intervention regarding student progress
    • Tutoring
    • Career counseling & placement
    • Academic progress info
    • Library services
    • Bookstore services
    • Ongoing technical support
    • Referrals for student learning differences, physical challenges and personal counseling
    • Access to grievance procedures

Current state of assessment

  • Sent out survey to IE people
  • 42 out of 58 schools responded (grouped respondents by 75% above/below)
    • 93% online admission app
    • 92.9% – online FA app
    • Online advising – 75.65
    • Disability services – 75
    • Tutoring – 76
    • Bookstore- 80.5
    • Online placement testing – 61.9
    • New student orientation- 59.5
    • Registration – 63.4
    • Career services – 61.5
    • Counseling – 69.2
    • Online club, SGA, Activities – 65

How is the institution developing a sense of community – ease of use, meet their needs, that questions are replied to in a timely manner…how are students connected to SGA, clubs, activities…how is that built in.

Depth, breadth, interactivity, and integration of service

Project purpose:

  • Develop a guide/recommendations for Online Student Services
  • Develop recommendations to the System office

Monday Keynote

[from Lela Mac] This was Dr Saundra Wall Wiliams.  I thoroughly enjoyed listening to her speak, she was quite dynamic.  She shared a heart-warming story of growing up and helping her dad learn fractions..to better himself with a different job…the story went full circle as her neice just a couple of years ago was teaching him to use a laptop…the story emphasizing how Learning is a LifeLong process.

Some of the high spots:

There are areas we need to plan for (future of DL):

  • We have large numbers of students that keep growing and our facilities will not be able to hold them all.  But we can’t just keep adding more on-line courses without a plan for Student Services.
  • We need a model to make sure ALL of the students needs are met (if we are going to enroll them).
  • We have to teach our students HOW to learn at a distance.  They need to feel secure about their learning, many being insecure (ie..displaced workers)
  • Collaboration is essential.  We need to be more of a DL Team (involving the whole campus).
  • Accountability is a must due to SACS accreditation.  They are gearing accreditation more and more toward DL.
  • Learning Object Repository – We should be using this.  Why re-create the wheel??
  • Technology perspective- The difference between traditional and Distance education is getting smaller and smaller
  • Trends:  Students are now “shopping” for colleges that can meet their needs.  They looks for the best technology.
  • COLT – Commission on Learning Technology- Let them know what you need!
  • Life long learning is a competitive necessity.

July 21, 2009

“Strengthening our Institution…” (Noel-Levitz presentation 7/09)

NL ppt 7_09CLICK HERE to download ppt

“Strengthening Our Institution The Power of Title III in Impacting Assessment, Distance Learning, & Advising at a Small, Rural Community College”

A presentation made at the 2009 Noel-Levitz National Conference on Student Recruitment, Marketing, and Retention

Abstract

Carteret Community College is a small, rural college in North Carolina. In 2006, the college was awarded a Title III grant from the US DOE Title III program, which has allowed us to completely alter our approaches to assessment, distance learning, and advising – all in an effort to improve abysmal retention rates.  The College has developed and implemented, from scratch, a comprehensive outcomes assessment initiative for all instructional programs and administrative services. Distance Learning, once the playground of the eccentric, has thrust the College into a statewide leadership role for online student services and instruction. A virtually non-existent advising program now has organization, purpose, and results.  Participants will hear the story, see the outcomes, and discuss organizational culture change.

Below are some of the key handouts from today’s presentation.  Much more can be learned about our efforts through this CCC Title III blog, as well as through the CCC DL blog.   We greatly appreciate your comments and questions.

The Presentation

Carteret Community College has been working diligently for the last 2+ years on the development and implementation of an Outcomes Assessment program. This is partly because of an impending accreditation reaffirmation report and a subsequent visit. But, mostly because it’s the right thing to do: We (like many other community colleges) struggle with retention issues, and improved instruction and services may lead to lower attrition rates. However, the only way to improve instruction and services is to know where you’re starting from and what needs to be improved, along with a continuous cycle of assessment, analysis, and use of results to ensure that you’re moving forward. Thus, the outcomes assessment program.

There is no doubt that a critical piece of this initiative has been funding through Title III. This has allowed our cash-strapped school to bring in experts to provide professional development specifically for outcomes assessment, to release full-time faculty in order to attend professional development, to provide stipends to part-time faculty to ensure that they too are receiving professional development, and to send faculty and staff to relevant, off-campus professional development opportunities.

This is where we have come in the last two years:

  • Institutional Level Learning Outcomes (ILLOs…aka, Gen Ed outcomes) identified and assessed at the college;

illo-07-08

Click here to download this file: illo-matrix-07-08 If you would like to learn a little about the process of actually selecting our 7 ILLOs, CLICK HERE.

  • All 34 instructional programs have identified program level learning outcomes (PLLOs) and are assessing them, analyzing the results, and making use of the results to improve instruction;

aqua-07-08Click here to download this sample PLLO from 2007-2008: aqu-07-08

  • All 34 instructional programs are on a 4-phase program review cycle; i.e. each program undergoes an intensive program review process every four years (in Fall ’09, we will begin Phase III);

ipr-manualClick here to download a copy of the Instructional Program Review Manual: ipr-manual You can also take a look at sample completed (Phase I & Phase II) program reviews by CLICKING HERE.

  • As the instructional programs undergo the review process, they also identify and assess Program and Administrative outcomes, analyze the results, and make use of the results;
  • All administrative units at the college have identified administrative outcomes and are assessing them, analyzing the results, and making use of the results to improve the services being provided;

academic-support-07-08

Click here to download this sample Administrative Outcome: academic-support-07-08

  • All administrative units are on a 3-phase administrative unit review cycle.

aur-manual

Click here to download a copy of the Administrative Unit Review Manual: admin-unit-review-manual

April 24, 2009

Closing the Loop: Creating a Culture of Outcomes Assessment at a Community College

Filed under: T3 Presentations — Donald Staub @ 1:00 am

ppt-cover-page

Click here to download a pdf of the ppt:ncsu-4_09

Abstract for this conference session:

Carteret Community College has developed and implemented an across-the-board assessment process.  All instructional programs and administrative/service units identify and assess, and use the results of, relevant outcomes. This session will describe the process of moving the college from an outputs-based to an outcomes-based assessment model.  The discussion will center on two primary activities: 1) Effectively developing and implementing a cross-campus process; and 2) Ensuring that faculty and staff move from a belief that “I’m being told to do this” to one of “I understand the value of this.”

Session Goals:
The primary goal of this session is for participants to discuss the development and implementation of an outcomes assessment plan at a community college. The two primary outcomes of the session are: 1) Effective development and implementation of a process; 2) Increasing faculty/staff buy-in.

Participants will learn about the identification and assessment of outcomes – program outcomes, administrative outcomes, institutional level learning outcomes, and program level learning outcomes. Participants will also learn about the development and implementation of outcomes-based Instructional Program Reviews and Administrative Unit Reviews.  Participants will also discuss the implementation of this process – working with faculty and staff on collecting data, analyzing the data, and utilizing the results for improvements in instruction and effective delivery of services.  A critical piece of this discussion will be the development of a common language and a common set of documents.

Faculty/staff buy-in is an essential indicator of successful implementation of this process. Participants in this session will learn about the methods employed by this community college to move the campus dialogue from confusion, frustration, and reticence to understanding, acceptance, and continuous improvement.

Session Content:

Carteret Community College has been working diligently for the last 2+ years on the development and implementation of an Outcomes Assessment program.  This is partly because of an impending accreditation reaffirmation report and a subsequent visit. But, mostly because it’s the right thing to do: We (like many other community colleges) struggle with retention issues, and improved instruction and services may lead to lower attrition rates.  However, the only way to improve instruction and services is to know where you’re starting from and what needs to be improved, along with a continuous cycle of assessment, analysis, and use of results to ensure that you’re moving forward.  Thus, the outcomes assessment program.

There is no doubt that a critical piece of this initiative has been funding through Title III.  This has allowed our cash-strapped school to bring in experts to provide professional development specifically for outcomes assessment, to release full-time faculty in order to attend professional development, to provide stipends to part-time faculty to ensure that they too are receiving professional development, and to send faculty and staff to relevant, off-campus professional development opportunities.

This is where we have come in the last two years:

  • Institutional Level Learning Outcomes (ILLOs…aka, Gen Ed outcomes) identified and assessed at the college;

illo-07-08

Click here to download this file: illo-matrix-07-08 If you would like to learn a little about the process of actually selecting our 7 ILLOs, CLICK HERE.

  • All 34 instructional programs have identified program level learning outcomes (PLLOs) and are assessing them, analyzing the results, and making use of the results to improve instruction;

aqua-07-08Click here to download this sample PLLO from 2007-2008: aqu-07-08

  • All 34 instructional programs are on a 4-phase program review cycle; i.e. each program undergoes an intensive program review process every four years (in Fall ’09, we will begin Phase III);

ipr-manualClick here to download a copy of the Instructional Program Review Manual: ipr-manual You can also take a look at sample completed (Phase I) program reviews by CLICKING HERE.

  • As the instructional programs undergo the review process, they also identify and assess Program and Administrative outcomes, analyze the results, and make use of the results;
  • All administrative units at the college have identified administrative outcomes and are assessing them, analyzing the results, and making use of the results to improve the services being provided;

academic-support-07-08

Click here to download this sample Administrative Outcome: academic-support-07-08

  • All administrative units are on a 3-phase administrative unit review cycle.

aur-manual

Click here to download a copy of the Administrative Unit Review Manual: admin-unit-review-manual

February 23, 2009

Assessing Online Instruction at Carteret Community College — Presentation at the 2009 Annual NC3ADL conference

Filed under: Presentations,T3 Presentations — Donald Staub @ 7:47 am
NC3ADL presentation ppt

NC3ADL presentation ppt

Click HERE to download the power point.

Carteret Community College offered its first online course in the spring of 1998.  In Fall 2008, the college offered 61 sections of full internet courses and 15 hybrid courses. [By Fall 2009, all courses at the college will have a web presence].

CCC is not different from most colleges with burgeoning distance learning programs. For most of the last decade, with corresponding increases in the number of distance learning courses and students, attention has been trained on providing faculty with the skills necessary to deliver effective online instruction [via Blackboard]. In particular, in 2006, the college was fortunate to have been awarded a 5-year Title III grant from the US Department of Education.  Of the three primary objectives for the grant, distance learning is one of them.

This grant has given the college the resources to train all full and part-time faculty to effectively teach online.  Faculty are certified to teach online through a three-module Blackboard Bootcamp, developed in-house.  This professional development provides instructors with the tools to design and develop online courses, including the utilization of rich-media content (e.g. podcasts, enhanced podcasts, teachertube videos, etc…).

The missing link thus has far has been an eye toward assessment of online delivery. While assessment has taken place by the instructors in the courses, we have not really systematically examined online delivery as an effective means for providing instruction (i.e. are students learning). [I’ll digress for a moment here to say that we are only looking at Full Internet and Hybrid courses…i.e. not the so-called Web-Based courses – primarily because there is such variation on what a WB course entails in terms of online instruction/learning]

This presentation is a description of our attempt to do just that.   I begin with some background regarding DL, particularly the quantitative information (enrollments, success rates, etc…).  I then talk about the four primary ways that we are looking at DL courses:
1) The Quality Assessment Plan: a peer-evaluation process of online courses before they are even allowed to “go live.”  (download the QAP by clicking here:  http://web.carteret.edu/keoughp/TitleIII/FinalQAP.xls)
2)  Grade Distributions: This is a broad-brush approach to see how students fared in any one semester (by way of final grades…i.e. “success”  and D, F, W rates).
3) ILLOs & PLLOs: How did students do on specific assignments that were related to either Institutional Level Learning Outcomes or Program Level Learning Outcomes.  For instance, how did students in both online and seated sections of CIS 110 (the course in which we assess our ILLO for Computer Literacy) score on their final class project?
4) Same instructor. Same course.  Teaching both seated and online sections of that course. We looked at common assignments for both sections and examined how students performed.

The Bottom Line
While there were some spots where there was a significant difference between how students performed in an online setting vs. a traditional/seated setting, these were probably more one-offs than evidence of a trend. To me, the most intriguing pieces to look at will be  A) Hybrid courses – Full internet courses for the last three fall semesters have seen an almost consistent 64% success rate.  Hybrid courses, on the other hand, have seen 80% success rates.  Should we be doing more Hybrids (instead of full onlines) is the obvious question.   And B) We need to drill deeper.  What student characteristics can we use as predictors of success when it comes to online instruction.  Should every student be allowed to take DL courses?  Yes.  But, should we look at which ones students should be advised to Not take, or should there be policies around the number of DL courses a student can take at a time…or the number they can take the semester after dropping a DL course(s).  These are issues that we need to explore further.

February 16, 2009

Home Grown Online Student Services at Carteret Community College

Filed under: Online services,Presentations,T3 Presentations — Donald Staub @ 3:45 pm

NC3ADL presentation Feb 16, 2009


(click HERE to download ppt)

In 2006, the Title III – Distance Learning team began making plans for offering student services online.  There were a number of key factors driving this decision.  First, there is the issue of accreditation.  As distance learning becomes a more integral aspect of education, it is garnering greater attention from accrediting bodies (in our case, SACS – the Southern Association of Schools & Colleges).  SACS  mandates that, “students have adequate access to the range of services appropriate to support the programs.”  For this reason (and the fact that we are up for reaffirmation in 2009-2010) inspired us to look closely at developing online services, accessible to all of our students (and not just online students).

But, we believe that the more compelling reason to begin exploration of online services is because it’s the right thing to do.  First, the number of DL students is increasing all the time.  So, yes, we need to give them access to the same services that all students who come to campus can access. True, a great many of our DL students come to campus anyway, which leads us to the second reason for developing online services.  Our students are changing.  This may be a rural community, but a great many of our students are exhibiting many of the characteristics that define the so-called millennial generation.  One of these traits is a blurring of time and space.  Students (of all ages, really) are not space bound (i.e. learning takes place as much off campus as on), nor are they time bound (i.e. just because the class or day is over does not mean that they don’t want access to the college at any time they have a free moment, no matter what time it is).

Finally, we are driven by cold, hard facts.  Through grades and attrition, the numbers tells us that our students need a broad support net to ensure their success in class, and throughout the whole college experience.  Therefore, we are working hard to develop and put online services for tutoring, counseling, career coaching, and financial aid assistance.

October 16, 2008

NCCCS Assessment Presentation (Oct 2008)

Filed under: T3 Presentations — Donald Staub @ 10:44 am
Tags:


Outcomes Assessment


sacs-instructors-conf

On October 14th I (Don) was fortunate to co-present with our President, Dr. Joseph Barwick, on the issues of SACS and outcomes-based assessment. Dr. Barwick’s presentation highlighted the evolution and recent history of SACS, as the focus has shifted from an outputs to outcomes based process. You can click on his powerpoint above to download his presentation.

Don Staub is the director of the Title III grant at Carteret Community College. The Title III grant has three primary goals for improving retention at the college: Advising, Distance Learning, and Outcomes Assessment. To read the grant asbstract, or to download a copy of our proposal, check out this posting.

The presentation that Don made at the NCCCS conference (immediately following Dr. Barwick’s presentation) provided an overview of the outcomes assessment process that the college has implemented since fall 2006. Don’s discussion laid out the process, particularly in terms of Outputs and Outcomes. The primary outputs of the process, in addition to the numerous professional development workshops held over the course of the last two years, have been the documents that we use for outcomes and the review processes (instructional program and administrative unit). As Don mentioned during the presentation, he was going to post copies of all relevant documents here in this blog…so here they are:

(Note that each of the following documents which are in pdf format are thus because we cannot upload excel documents to this blog…if you would like the original excel document (so that you do not have to reproduce it) feel free to contact me at staubd@carteret.edu.)

The Institutional Level Learning Outcomes (ILLO) Matrix
These are CCC’s General Education core competencies, which the collge has identified through a democratic process. If you click on the link below the image, you can download the 07-08 ILLO matrix, which highlights the outcomes, the assessment methods, the results of the assessments, and the use of results. We are in the process of collecting data from relevant fall 08 courses to determine the degree to which the “use of results” have yielded positive progress.

illo-matrix-07-08

Administrative/Service Unit Outcomes Assessment form
Each of the Administrative/Service Units on campus submit outcomes assessment plans. Here is the form that they fill out, identifying the outcome, the assessment method, the results, and the use of results.
prog-admin-outcomes7_08

Program Level Learning Outcomes form
Each of the instructional programs from the college submit outcomes assessment plans for their programs. In general, each of the programs submit 3-5 outcomes. Completed assessment forms are due in May, at the end of the school year.
pllo-form-7_08

The Administrative Unit Review Manual
This is the document that all administrative/service units on campus will use to guide their review process. The units are on a three-year review cycle (we call them phases). This year (08-09) is the first year that we are implementing this rigorous, comprehensive process. Previously, the Administrative Unit review process was outcomes oriented, but less detailed and less analytical. This year, our Administrative Unit and Corporate and Community Education divisions are implementing this review process.
admin-unit-review-manual

Relevant documents/forms for the Administrative Review Process include:
The Administrative Unit Outcomes Form
prog-admin-outcomes7_08

The Staff Information Form
staff-information-form

The SWOT Planning Form
swot-planning-form

The Instructional Program Review Manual
All instructional programs at the college implement a comprehensive, peer-review process. The 34 programs at the college are divided into 4 phases (i.e. a 4-year cycle). 2008-2009 is the second year of implementation of this process. To learn about (2007-2008) Phase I programs and to review their final review documents, click this link.

instruct-program-rev-manual

Relevant documents for the program review process include the above mentioned PLLO form, Administrative outcomes form, SWOT form, the Faculty Information Formfaculty-information-form

…and the Program Outcomes Formprog-outcomes-form-7_08

If there are any other documents or information that may help you and your school move forward in Outcomes Assessment, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

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